Simplicity Cease Offering on InvestNow… but Don’t Let it Stop You

Last Friday I wrote about investing Simplicity non-KiwiSaver fund via InvestNow from as little as $250.

However, I am sorry to say this opinion is no longer available. Simplicity decided to cease offering on InvestNow.

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You can read the statement from InvestNow here.

I am personally disappointed as this is a great way for anyone to invest in a quality low-cost fund with a low initial investment. I was planning to invest in Simplicity fund but I don’t have the fund until next month, so I missed out on that.

What does it mean for the investors?

If you are InvestNow user and you already invested your money into Simplicity fund via InvestNow, you will be able to hold your investment in the fund, but you will not be able to make new investment.

For those who wanted to join Simplicity Fund but don’t have $10k available, you will have to keep saving until you reach $10k…. or not. Hear me out!

Don’t wait, Start NOW!

If you have some money to invest now, you don’t have to wait. I would suggest you invest those fund elsewhere rather than save for months and years to reach $10K.

I know Simplicity fund is excellent, and I may even say it’s the best fund in this country. However, that is just the best fund when you have $10k or more. It doesn’t mean you can’t invest in anything else before you come up with $10K.

You can invest in Superlife 80, which is similar to Simplicity growth fund. Superlife 80 holds 80% growth asset (Share, property) and 20% income asset (Bond, cash). They also invested in Vanguard fund and ETF. Superlife a higher management fee (0.50%) and small annual fee ($12). The most important thing is there is no minimum initial investment requirement. If you are young and happy with the risk, you can go with Superlife 100, a managed fund with 100% growth asset, something Simplicity do not offer.

If you already put the money in InvestNow, you can invest in their Vanguard fund with just 0.26% fee. Simplicity Growth invested 60% into that fund (and you will have to pay tax on dividends received). I’ve done a blog post on that.

My point is, there are lots different opinion for investor out there. Don’t let that $10K hurdles stop you and start investing. You will reach $10k before you know it.

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Cheapest Way to buy and hold NZ Top 50 ETF

I always encourage people to start a small investment with NZ Top 50 ETF and US 500 ETF when they are starting out. Those two ETFs are easy to understand, diversified, low-cost and have low minimum investment requirement ($500). They are ideal for long term (7 years+) investment. So here is the cheapest way to buy and hold NZ Top 50 ETF.

I will be discussing average investment here. I do not include KiwiSaver opinion here because you can’t get the money out before 65. (Anyway, ETF still an excellence option for KiwiSaver, especially for anyone aged under 50)

What is NZ Top 50 ETF?

Quote from Smart Shares Web Site:

The NZ Top 50 Fund invests in financial products listed on the NZX Main Board and is designed to track the return on the S&P/NZX 50 Portfolio Index. The S&P/NZX 50 Portfolio Index is made up of 50 of the largest financial products listed on the NZX Main Board. The S&P/NZX 50 Portfolio Index is made up of the same financial products as the S&P/NZX 50 Index, but with a 5% cap on the weight of each product.

So basically when you invest in NZ Top 50, you will have a share in the top 50 companies in NZ stock market.

Stock code for NZ Top 50 ETF is FNZ.NZ

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Where and how to buy?

There are three ways to purchase NZ Top 50 ETF, on the stock market, with investment fund or monthly contribution.

Trade on the stock exchange – NZ Top 50 ETF can be traded as share on stock market via any stock broker. I will be using ANZ Securities online and ASB securities online here as they are amongst the cheapest brokers in New Zealand.

Purchase with FundSuperlife (Smartshare’s sister company) offer NZ Top 50 ETF fund that holds shares in NZ Top 50 ETF. You can set up an account and purchase those fund with Superlife.

Purchase via monthly contribution – This is the most accessible and fixable way to buy into ETF, both Superlife and Smartshare offer that service. You need set up an account with at least $500 initial investment, and contribution $50 monthly to purchase that ETF or fund.

What’re the fees?

Basically, you should look for the lowest fee when you consider investing into the same product.

ANZ & ASB Securities online: You can purchase FNZ directly on the stock market with ANZ Securities. ANZ cheapest rate is $29.90/trade under $15000. However, you have to be an Online Multi-Currency Account (OMCA) holders with sufficient cleared funds available to fully cover the purchase of securities prior to submission of the order. Otherwise, ANZ charge $29.90 + 0.40% on trade. If you are not an OMCA holder with ANZ, go with ASB Securities, they charge $30 or 0.30% per transactions, whichever higher. On top of that, NZ 50 ETF charge 0.50% p.a. on management fee base on your total holding before they pay out. If you did the calculation, in order to pay the least amount of fees, you should only make one trade a year with over $10000, which will bring the fee% to 0.80%.

Smartshares: You can make lump sum investment and monthly contribution with smartshare. They will charge a one-time $30 account setup fee and charge 0.50% p.a. management fee base on your total holding. Check out the SmartShares disclosure statement here.

Superlife: Same as Smartshare, you can do lump sum investment and monthly contribution. They charge a $12 p.a. administration fee and 0.49% management for NZ 50 Top ETF. Check out Superlife disclosure statement here.

Cheapest Way?

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Smartshares is the cheapest way to buy and hold FNZ. Superlife’s fee will become cheaper once the holding passed 120K.

I personally used both Smartshares and Superlife, and I think Superlife have a much better user interface and app. The $12 admin fee can be shared with other Superlife funds.

So if you just want to buy FNZ, Smartshare is the best deal out there. If you already have other funds with Superlife, there is not much difference in cost between Superlife and SmartShares.

Although ASB and ANZ Securities’ cost are higher, you should open an account with them if you got ETF from SmartShares. Since you are buying actually share of ETF via Smartshare, you will need a stock broker when you need to sell your share.

Email thesmartandlazy@gmail.com or follow me on Twitter @thesmartandlazy if you have any questions.

Will you switch KiwiSaver plan during a market correction?

as [I wrote this back in 5th Oct 2016]

I’ve got into a discussion with a colleague about changing KiwiSaver plan. He is in his 30s and he decided to switch his growth plan to a defensive scheme. His reasoning was that he thinks there is a market correction coming in late 2016 or the first half of 2017, so by switching to the defensive scheme, he can avoid a drop in his investment. He will switch back to growth once we are out of the correction.

I do agree there is a market correction coming and a defensive scheme will do better in a down market compared to a growth plan.

Let’s use Superlife income (defensive scheme) and Superlife60 (growth) as an example.

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During the 2008 GFC, most markets were down by A LOT. SuperLife income returned about 6% to 8% during 2008-2009 and SuperLife60 was returning -8% to -14% at the same time. So if you start your Kiwisaver in 07 in SuperLife 60 (returning 4.8%), then switch to SuperLife Income at 08, 09 (6% and 8%), and finally switch back to SuperLife 60 at 2010 (15%). You would have returned on average 8.45% p.a. while SuperLife 60 was returning -0.55% in those four years.

By looking at the math, it’s all great, but the main question is HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN TO SWITCH? We are trying to time the market. The return looks great when we do it retrospectively, but in reality, it takes lots of time, resource and knowledge to time the market and people who are experts in that area still don’t get it right. If we switch too early, we may miss out on the last bit of gain. On the other hand, if we change too late, we will take the hit of the initial crash.

I am personally not sure about this. I was trying to time the market back in 2014, and I was wrong. The conventional wisdom was to ignore the ups and downs of the market and keep your investment in a growth fund. You will ride it out eventually. However, somewhere in my mind I still think I can get a better return by switching. Not to a defensive scheme but a balanced scheme to smooth it out.

[Now, back to March 2017]

I ended up keeping the growth fund and it turned out great. The return on those months is far better than the defensive fund. The main reason was due to the poor performance of income asset in the last quarter of 2016.

However, this post is not about growth fund doing better than the defensive fund during that time period. In fact, I’d still be happy if the defensive fund did better because the performance for my KiwiSaver in a single quarter only has a tiny impact on the lifetime of my fund. The lesson I learned was to stick to right fund for me, just sit back and let it grow.

Email thesmartandlazy@gmail.com or follow me on Twitter @thesmartandlazy if you have any questions.

Compare ETF cost between SuperLife and SmartShares

(The information in this post is not longer up-to-date. Please check the most recent update here)

In case you don’t know, I am in the camp of passive low-cost investing. So most of my investment are in ETF and index fund.

Currently, the easiest way to buy and hold ETF in New Zealand is with SmartShares and SuperLife. Both companies are owned by NZX and they are selling basically the same ETF product. However, the cost of the ETF are different with those 2 companies and I’ve put together a table to compare them.

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In general, SuperLife offers lower fund management fees. However, they do charge a $12/year admin fee which makes SuperLife more expensive when you are starting out. You should, therefore, start with SmartShares and once your hold reaches the “When to Switch” amount, you can move your fund to SuperLife to enjoy the lower cost and the better user interface.

My table is based on the assumption that you have only 1 fund in SuperLife. If you have multiple funds with SuperLife, that $12 admin fee will be shared by those funds and you can divide the “Switch to SuperLife” amount by the numbers of funds you’ve got.

Here is an example:

You are holding $15000 Global Bond ETF and $12000 Aust Property ETF with SmartSshares. Both of them alone did not pass the “When to Switch” limit. However, if you switch both of them to SuperLife, the “When to Switch” will be divided by the numbers of funds, which is 2, and the new “When to Switch” amount will be $24000/2 = $12000. You should, therefore, switch both of them over to save fees.

Email thesmartandlazy@gmail.com or follow me on Twitter @thesmartandlazy if you have any questions.